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Prospective Postdoctoral Fellows

I welcome PhD-level scientists with an interest in substance use and sexual risk behavior training to apply to work with me through the University of Florida’s multidisciplinary T32 NIAAA training program focused on alcohol and HIV infection. If you are interested in applying, click here. Alcohol and HIV research experience are not required. Please contact me if you have questions, and find more information here.

Prospective Graduate Students

I mentor graduate students in the University of Florida’s Department of Health Education and Behavior. Competitive funding is available through University of Florida’s multidisciplinary T32 NIAAA training program focused on alcohol and HIV infection. If you are interested in applying, click here. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis, but for funding considerations, please apply no later than December 31st. Please contact me if you have questions, and find more information here.

Prospective Research Assistants

I invite responsible, highly motivated, dedicated University of Florida undergraduate students with an interest in substance use and sexual risk behavior research to join my team of research assistants. If you are interested in applying, click here to open and download the application. Consideration will be given to applicants with a 3.00+ GPA and who can commit to at least two semesters of research. Please contact me if you have questions.

All research assistants will complete responsible conduct of research training. Research assistants will assist with project management, recruit participants, check voicemail logs, conduct phone screenings, and schedule laboratory sessions. Research assistants are responsible for entering data into Excel and SPSS and occasionally assisting with literature reviews and coding abstracts for systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Selected professional and reliable students will be considered for training in alcohol administration. During alcohol administration sessions, research assistants are responsible for interacting with participants while they consume alcohol and collecting data. Data collection can include administration of physiological measures (e.g., heart rate, skin conductance, blood pressure), behavioral measures (e.g., decisions during computer simulations and responses to stimuli presentation), and cognitive measures (e.g., sexual risk perception and emotion recognition).